The safety and efficacy of Celgene's CAR T cell therapies are under investigation and have not been established. There is no guarantee that these agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated.

Cancer Immune Response

Refresh your knowledge about the immune response to cancer, and how cancer can evade detection

CAR T Science

Learn about the science behind CAR T cell therapies

B Cell Malignancies

Learn about unmet needs in select B cell malignancies

CAR T Process

Learn what the CAR T therapy process may involve for you and your patients

B Cell Malignancies

  • DLBCL
  • MM
  • CLL
  • FL
DLBCL -

B Cell Malignancies by Incidence*,1

DLBCL: 23%, MM†: 20%, CLL‡: 19%, FL: 12%, Other: 26%

5-year relative survival (by age at diagnosis)2

  • All ages: 62.8%
  • Age 65+: 53.0%

Patient demographics

  • Incidence: 62,2181
  • New cases per 100,000:
    • 6.6 male: 4.5 female2
    • 33.5 age 65+ at diagnosis1
  • Race: Most common in white and Hispanic (all race) patients3
*Percentages based on total US incidence of 267,746 B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program database, 2006-2015.1
Includes plasma cell leukemia.
Includes small lymphocytic lymphoma.

Up to half of patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) will relapse or be refractory to first-line treatment+-

DLBCL Age-specific Incidence Rate3

Age-specific incidence rates for select lymphoid neoplasm subtypes in the United States from 2011 to 2012.

Half of patients with DLBCL are under age 70.5

Those with refractory or relapsed disease have a need for additional treatment options.4

Conventional Therapy

First-line: Chemoimmunotherapy

Survival rates for patients with DLBCL have improved since the introduction of chemoimmunotherapy as mainstay induction treatment4,6 However, nearly 40% of patients treated with chemoimmunotherapy will experience disease progression.7

Second-line: Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT)

High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplant (HD-ASCT) has been shown to outperform chemotherapy alone in the relapsed setting.8 Among patients with chemosensitive disease who are able to undergo ASCT, ~50% will ultimately relapse.4

As many as 75% of patients will be ineligible for second-line ASCT due to insufficient response to chemotherapy, advanced age, comorbidities, or difficulties accessing treatment.9-11

MM +
CLL +
FL +

Consider Your Patient’s Treatment Options

In the community

Approximately 85% of cancer diagnoses are made in the community setting. Due largely to proximity, as well as economic and other personal reasons, many of these patients receive treatment at community centers, versus academic institutions.35 For patients with aggressive, high-risk disease, accessing treatment at an academic center may be a challenge.36

At an academic or specialized transplant center

Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) may be the second-line standard in r/r B cell lymphomas, but up to 75% of patients are ineligible, mainly due to insufficient response to salvage chemotherapy.11 Patient fitness and travel issues may limit the feasibility of accessing certain treatments.

Patients who are able to undergo ASCT—or possibly allogeneic SCT for patients with CLL—go through a 28-day process of inpatient care at a specialized hospital with an approved transplant center.37-39

Even with successful second- or later-line transplantation, these patients will eventually relapse and are in need of additional treatment options.4

Additional options are needed

For patients with late-stage, relapsed B cell malignancies, there is a need for additional treatment options—median overall survival for these patients is measured in months.4

In 2018, SEER estimated approximately 126,000 new cases of B cell lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma, and 37,000 deaths.40

In the community -

Approximately 85% of cancer diagnoses are made in the community setting. Due largely to proximity, as well as economic and other personal reasons, many of these patients receive treatment at community centers, versus academic institutions.35 For patients with aggressive, high-risk disease, accessing treatment at an academic center may be a challenge.36

At an academic or specialized transplant center +

Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) may be the second-line standard in r/r B cell lymphomas, but up to 75% of patients are ineligible, mainly due to insufficient response to salvage chemotherapy.11 Patient fitness and travel issues may limit the feasibility of accessing certain treatments.

Patients who are able to undergo ASCT—or possibly allogeneic SCT for patients with CLL—go through a 28-day process of inpatient care at a specialized hospital with an approved transplant center.37-39

Even with successful second- or later-line transplantation, these patients will eventually relapse and are in need of additional treatment options.4

Additional options are needed +

For patients with late-stage, relapsed B cell malignancies, there is a need for additional treatment options—median overall survival for these patients is measured in months.4

In 2018, SEER estimated approximately 126,000 new cases of B cell lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma, and 37,000 deaths.40

References:

  1. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed February 15, 2018.
  2. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed November 26, 2018.
  3. Teras LR, DeSantis CE, Cerhan JR, et al. CA Cancer J Clin. 2016;66:443-459.
  4. Crump M, Neelapu SS, Farooq U et al. Blood. 2017;130:1800-1808.
  5. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed November 26, 2018.
  6. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed February 15, 2018.
  7. Coiffier B, Thieblemont C, Van Den Neste E, et al. Blood. 2010;116:2040-2045. doi:10.1182/blood-2010-03-276246.
  8. Philip T, Guglielmi C, Hagenbeek A, et al.N Engl J Med. 1995;333:1540-1545.
  9. Gisselbrecht C, Schmitz N, Mounier N, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2012;30:4462-4469.
  10. Friedberg JW. Hematology. 2011;498-505.
  11. Van Den Neste E, Schmitz N, Mounier N, et al. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2016;51:51-57.
  12. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed February 15, 2018.
  13. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed November 26, 2018.
  14. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed November 26, 2018.
  15. Sonneveld P, Broijl A. Haematologica. 2016;101:396-406.
  16. Nijhof IS, van de Donk NWCJ, Zweegman S, et al. Drugs. 2018;78:19-37.
  17. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Multiple Myeloma V.2.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Accessed January 29, 2019. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.
  18. Gertz MA, Dingli D. Blood. 2014;124:882-890.
  19. Facon T, Dimopoulos MA, Dispenzieri A, et al. Blood. 2018;131:301-310.
  20. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed November 26, 2018.
  21. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed February 15, 2018.
  22. Thompson PA, Tam CS, O'Brien SM et al. Blood. 2016;127:303-309.
  23. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed September 29, 2018.
  24. Strati P. Lancet Haematol. 2017;4:e97-e98.
  25. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma V.4.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Accessed April 15, 2019. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.
  26. Shustik C, Bence-Bruckler I, Delage R, et al. Ann Hematol. 2017;96:1185-1196.
  27. Federico M, Bellei M, Marcheselli L, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2009;27:4555-4562.
  28. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed November 26, 2018.
  29. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed September 29, 2018.
  30. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for B-Cell Lymphomas V.2.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Accessed April 15, 2019. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.
  31. Nooka AK, Nabhan C, Zhou X, et al. Ann Oncol. 2013;24:441-448.
  32. Hiddeman W, Cheson BD. Leukemia. 2014;28:1388-1395.
  33. Casulo C, Byrtek M, Dawson KL, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2015;33:2516-2523.
  34. Sebban C, Brice P, Delarue R, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2008; 26:3614-3620.
  35. National Cancer Institute. Accessed February 22, 2019.
  36. American Society of Clinical Oncology. Accessed February 22, 2019.
  37. Medscape. Accessed March 19, 2018.
  38. American Cancer Society. Accessed September 29, 2018.
  39. American Cancer Society. Accessed September 6, 2018.
  40. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Accessed February 15, 2018.

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